STLR Forum

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3 11, 2017

Growing Concerns Regarding the Burden of Proof on Stand Your Ground Pretrial Hearings in Florida

November 3rd, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Governments, Gun Rights|0 Comments

By: Luis A. Garcia Jr., J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In June 2017, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law shifting the burden of proof onto the prosecution when dealing with an immunity known as “Stand Your Ground” during pretrial hearings. According to Florida Statutes § 776.012, a person has […]

2 11, 2017

Bound to be Bound: Enforceability of BDSM Contracts

November 2nd, 2017|Blog, Contracts, Criminal Law|0 Comments

By: Diana Alcala, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Even though the practice of bondage and discipline, sadism and masochism (“BDSM”) has recently come into the mainstream consciousness in the form or movies and books, its portrayals are often inaccurate and as some members of the community might say, even problematic. Movies like […]

27 10, 2017

Prejudice or Not?: Next-Of-Kin Exception to Florida’s Sequestration Requirement Unfairly Prejudices Opposing Parties in Criminal Lawsuits

October 27th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

By: Ashley-Ann Bryan, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The Florida Rules of Evidence govern the activities of witnesses in lawsuits by sequestering active witnesses from the trial and other witnesses. However, there are four categories of witnesses whom are not subject to exclusion from the courtroom. Particularly, one such category includes the […]

26 10, 2017

Permanent Alimony: Should You Have To Pay Your Ex-Spouse For A Lifetime?

October 26th, 2017|Blog, Family Law, Financial, Florida|2 Comments

By: Danielle Capitini, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Let’s say that two high school sweethearts decide to marry at the age of 23 and end up having three children during the marriage. However, because of irreconcilable differences, the parties decide to divorce after 17 years of marriage. Because this marriage […]

25 10, 2017

Just Who Is The Enemy In The War Against Opioids?

October 25th, 2017|Blog, Business, Criminal Law, Governments|0 Comments

By: Martha Ferral, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The first step to solving a problem is identifying it, right? Right, so this problem that is seemingly simple is actually quite complex. And the only way to fix it is to have real perspective on this issue.

The opioid crisis is a war that […]

24 10, 2017

Using Common Sense When Analyzing What Qualifies as a Crime Involving Moral Turpitude

October 24th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights, Immigration|0 Comments

By: Curtis Wurster, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Under federal law, it is a federal crime to misrepresent a social security number to be one’s own “for any … purpose”. Furthermore, whoever, for the purpose of obtaining a benefit to which they are not entitled, willfully, knowingly, and with intent to deceive, […]

23 10, 2017

I Know What You Did Last Weekend: Social Media And How It Affects The Lives Of Student-Athletes

October 23rd, 2017|Blog, First Amendment, Free Speech, Governments, Sports and Entertainment Law|0 Comments

By: Rosie Gil, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Homecoming week just ended and you helped your team beat your district rivals in your home field. The team’s captain decided to throw a huge party after you scored the winning touchdown. Most of the city shows up, it gets out of hand, alcohol […]

22 10, 2017

Law School Entrance Exams: The LSAT vs. The GRE

October 22nd, 2017|Blog, Business, Law Schools|0 Comments

By: Danielle DeMahy, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Throughout the past few years there has been an emerging trend regarding law school application requirements—the Graduate Record Examination test (“GRE”). There has been a gradual increase in law schools allowing their applicants to submit with their application either the Law School […]

21 10, 2017

Incompetence and the Members of the Jury

October 21st, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

By: Jennifer Garcia, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

There is no doubt that the legal process is a complicated one and that not everyone who is not trained in the legal profession can adeptly follow the proceedings that take place inside a courtroom. However, when it comes to depriving someone of their […]

19 10, 2017

Three Reasons Why Patent Disputes Should Not Be Decided By A Jury

October 19th, 2017|Blog, Business, Cases, Intellectual Property|0 Comments

By: Jennifer Weiss, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On August 24, 2012, seven women and two men gathered in San Francisco, California, to deliberate what would become one of the most significant patent cases in United States history: Apple v. Samsung. The trial involved more than 700 questions regarding alleged patent infringement […]