STLR Forum

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Euthanasia on the Opposite End of Corporal Punishment: Hypocritical Standpoint?

By: Ashley Ann Bryan, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, December 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

With the growth of technology and great advancement of modern-day medicine, there should be a reconsideration of the legality and use of euthanasia. However, there continues to be a reluctance in this regard, while the legality and support of capital punishment […]

November 13th, 2018|Criminal Law, Elder Law, Florida, Human Rights|0 Comments

#TIMESUP YouTube

By: Elina Rojas, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

With the ever growing expansion of YouTube celebrities and influencers comes a dark side: sexual misconduct.  Sexual misconduct is an umbrella term for actions that are sexual in nature and are conducted without consent. Typically, sexual misconduct involves situations where power dynamics in […]

Got Informed Consent?

By: Christina Trueba, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Hubert Humphrey once said, “the moral test of government is how that government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life, the […]

April 24th, 2018|Blog, Elder Law, Health Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

“If it Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix it” … New Title IX Approach to Sexual Misconduct in Universities

By: Ashley-Ann Bryan, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Title IX is a federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. More specifically, Title IX aims to protect both men and women form sexual harassment and violence in educational institutions that receive federal funding. The law provides that “once a school […]

Death with Dignity Act: Oregon’s Merciful Law

By: Jennifer Garcia, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Whether terminally ill patients have a right to end their life, and thereby their pain and suffering, has been debated for ages.  In the United States, the practice of physician-assisted death is prohibited in most states by either an express statute or application […]

April 9th, 2018|Blog, Criminal Law, Governments, Human Rights|0 Comments

Time Is Most Definitely Up

By: Jacqueline Rosado, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Less than a year ago, on October 5, 2017, a scandal was revealed big enough to make waves not only on a national, but global scale. There is no better way than to identify the “monster” behind this scandal as Harvey Weinstein, […]

Leaving “Home”: TPS for Venezuela?

By: Kemil A. Saab, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

It is no secret that Venezuela is living in chaos and experiencing one of the worst crises in the world.  Since 2001, Venezuela’s socio-economic and political situation has declined, resulting in the world highest inflation of 254.9%.  The uncontrolled inflation has […]

April 7th, 2018|Blog, Human Rights, Immigration, International|0 Comments

Prisoners of the Zip Code: How Single Zip Code Rate-Making Hurts the Public Interest

By: Ansell Fernandez, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

This comment argues that setting auto insurance rates based on socioeconomic factors from a single ZIP Code, as it is now allowed in Florida, may violate Florida law prohibiting the use of race or national origin in calculating premiums. The comment […]

March 21st, 2018|Abstracts, Cases, Financial, Human Rights, Issues|0 Comments

A Right Without a Remedy: Time Runs Out Before the Right to File Accrues for Successive Habeas Corpus Petitioners

By: Agnieszka Chiapperini, Articles Solicitation Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

In June of 2015, the Supreme Court struck down a portion of a federal statute as unconstitutional. For the next ten months, District Courts all over the country came to inconsistent conclusions regarding the new decision’s retroactive application.  As a […]

March 14th, 2018|Abstracts, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights, Issues|0 Comments

Dostoevsky as Juvenile Justice Advocate and Progenitor of Therapeutic Justice

By: Professor Amy D. Ronner J.D. Ph.D., Professor of Law, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

Undeniably, the physical and psychological abuse of children is a recurrent theme in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s fiction and journalism, particularly in The Brothers Karamazov and A Writer’s Diary.  In three parts, this paper explores Dostoevsky’s fixation with childhood suffering and […]

February 28th, 2018|Abstracts, Family Law, Human Rights, Latest Articles|0 Comments