STLR Forum

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Will Florida’s Supreme Court Stand for Self-Defense?

By: Tahimi Magrans, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The highly criticized “Stand Your Ground Law” is up to the Florida Supreme Court. However, the question before the Court is not whether it is constitutional but whether it applies to cases retroactively that were pending at the time the statute became […]

December 27th, 2018|Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Illusion or Collusion? Colin Kaepernick’s Biggest Hurdle

By: Jonathan Manoy, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On August 14, 2016, Colin Kaepernick, in a San Francisco 49ers pre-season game, sat during the National Anthem. This move set the stage for the silent protest movement that gained numerous followers and became so controversial during the 2016-17 N.F.L. season. Kaepernick […]

December 20th, 2018|Business, Evidence, Sports and Entertainment Law|0 Comments

Law and Disorder: The Movement to End Rape Kit Backlogging

By: Lauren Cabrera, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Twenty-three-year-old Melissa Souto walked into the hospital with her parents by her side. Eye contact was avoided, and the feeling of shame consumed her. The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner walked out and called Melissa to enter the examining room.  The nurse’s kind demeanor […]

December 17th, 2018|Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Shouldn’t Criminal Justice Live Up to Its Name? A Call to Forego Felony Murder and Consider Felony Manslaughter.

By: Jikky Thankachan, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

At just sixteen years old, A’Donte Washington was shot four times and killed by an anonymous police officer. The officer will face no consequence for this murder, but another person will. Washington’s friend Lakeith Smith, who was only 15 at the time […]

Man’s Best Friend Saves the Day, Once Again

By: Jesse Ochoa, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Usually, it is Timmy who pleads to his companion, Lassie, to find help when he is in a sticky predicament; this time, it was Joshua Horner, a man in Oregon who needed to find Lucy, a black Labrador, that could reverse […]

November 5th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Carpenter v. United States: Does the Government Need a Warrant to Obtain Cellphone Location Information?

By: Candice C. Izaguirre, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The Fourth Amendment protects “he right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures. . . ” Does this right apply to cellphone data?

In June 2017, the Supreme Court granted certiorari […]

iPhone Video Re-Recordings: Inaccurate Duplicates Under Federal Law

By: Yamila Lorenzo, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Cell phones have become necessary devices in our everyday lives. The essential nature of these devices has lead developers to put everything a user might need in their daily lives into the devices, including powerful cameras. When looking through a tourist area […]

October 9th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

The Use of Modern Technology Should Not Be An Implied Consent to Governmental Intrusion

By: Jessica Vega, Senior Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Recently, the United States Supreme Court (“SCOTUS”) granted certiorari in Carpenter v. United States, to determine whether the Fourth Amendment protects individuals against warrantless searches and seizures in the modern technological era, regarding cell-site-location information records (“CSLI”).  Pursuant to the Fourth […]

September 20th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Evidence, Fourth Amendment, Supreme Court|0 Comments