STLR Forum

/Criminal Law
­

Should Hate Crimes Be Their Own Crime or a Considered Factor in Sentencing?

By: Heather Carngeie, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In today’s society, hate crimes and hate speech are rampaging more than they have in many years, but what if that behavior itself was punishable rather than being coupled with other crimes, such as assault, as a sentencing factor? Would it better […]

October 12th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, LGBT Rights|0 Comments

iPhone Video Re-Recordings: Inaccurate Duplicates Under Federal Law

By: Yamila Lorenzo, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Cell phones have become necessary devices in our everyday lives. The essential nature of these devices has lead developers to put everything a user might need in their daily lives into the devices, including powerful cameras. When looking through a tourist area […]

October 9th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Students “Packing” on College Campuses

By: Jacqueline Rosado, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Florida Republicans are once again trying to introduce multiple gun bills before the Florida Legislature. The “Open Carry and Prohibited Places Reform” bill, sponsored by Senator Greg Steube, will help “expand the places and circumstances under which gun owners can carry their […]

October 3rd, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Governments, Gun Rights, Trending|0 Comments

Saint or Sinner? Man Convicted of Using Santeria to Coerce Victims into Having Sex

By: Cynthia Ventura, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On September 22, 2017, Sergio Carmona-Martinez was found guilty by a jury of five counts of sexual battery on a victim between the ages of twelve and eighteen. Carmona-Martinez, who knew both victims, told the first girl that she was surrounded by a “bad […]

September 28th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Trending|0 Comments

Too Hot to Bother: Eleven Elderly Patients Dead. But Who’s to Blame?

By: Natasha Mathurin, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

We’ve all woken up in the dead of night and felt the colony of sweat beads dancing over our skin. The dense air roasting us like a sauna. Our bodies tossing and turning in a heat of confusion, as we start tugging at our […]

September 26th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Trending|0 Comments

Geographic Targeting Orders Crack Down on Real Estate Money Laundering, but Loopholes Remain

By: Idelys Martinez, Senior Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In January of 2016, the United States Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) responded to money laundering concerns in the State of Florida.  Their response consisted of issuing Geographic Targeting Orders (GTOs) in an effort to crack down […]

September 23rd, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Financial|0 Comments

Jail: The 21st Century Mental Asylum

By: Elizabeth Irazabal, Managing Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The days of the “traditional” mental asylum have long been numbered. The image of a mental asylum filled with individuals strapped into white jackets, surrounded by rubber walls, with nurses roaming the ward has slowly transitioned into the image of inmates in […]

September 22nd, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

The Use of Modern Technology Should Not Be An Implied Consent to Governmental Intrusion

By: Jessica Vega, Senior Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Recently, the United States Supreme Court (“SCOTUS”) granted certiorari in Carpenter v. United States, to determine whether the Fourth Amendment protects individuals against warrantless searches and seizures in the modern technological era, regarding cell-site-location information records (“CSLI”).  Pursuant to the Fourth […]

September 20th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Evidence, Fourth Amendment, Supreme Court|0 Comments

The Extraordinary Impact of the No Impact Rule: A Call for Recession

By: Curtis Wurster, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Under Florida law, in order for a plaintiff to prevail on a claim of negligent infliction of emotional distress they must suffer a physical impact from an external force, i.e something must physically come into contact with a them. See Willis v. Gami Golden […]

April 3rd, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law|0 Comments

Kansas State University’s Attempt To Escape Liability

By: Jessica Vega, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Recently, Kansas State University (“KSU”) asserted its blanket policy and refused to investigate a peer-on-peer sexual assault claim that occurred at an off-campus school-sanctioned fraternity house merely because the assault took place off campus. A KSU student, Sara Weckhorst (“Sara”), endured multiple humiliating and […]

March 29th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law|0 Comments