STLR Forum

/Criminal Law
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Just Who Is The Enemy In The War Against Opioids?

By: Martha Ferral, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The first step to solving a problem is identifying it, right? Right, so this problem that is seemingly simple is actually quite complex. And the only way to fix it is to have real perspective on this issue.

The opioid crisis is a war that […]

October 25th, 2017|Blog, Business, Criminal Law, Governments|0 Comments

Using Common Sense When Analyzing What Qualifies as a Crime Involving Moral Turpitude

By: Curtis Wurster, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Under federal law, it is a federal crime to misrepresent a social security number to be one’s own “for any … purpose”. Furthermore, whoever, for the purpose of obtaining a benefit to which they are not entitled, willfully, knowingly, and with intent to deceive, […]

October 24th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights, Immigration|0 Comments

Incompetence and the Members of the Jury

By: Jennifer Garcia, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

There is no doubt that the legal process is a complicated one and that not everyone who is not trained in the legal profession can adeptly follow the proceedings that take place inside a courtroom. However, when it comes to depriving someone of their […]

October 21st, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

Prosecutorial Discretion: Absolute or Absolutely Not

By: Jamie Mathis, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

During a press conference on March 15, 2017, newly-elected Florida State Attorney Aramis Ayala brazenly announced she “will not pursue the death penalty in any case during her tenure.” This decision also included seeking an alternate punishment other than the death penalty against Markeith […]

October 18th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Florida, Governments|1 Comment

Indigent Defendants’ Inability to Afford Bail

By: Brandon Greene, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Indigent defendants are required to “pay more than they can afford” to be released on bail. Scholars believe that the money-bail system mostly traps low-risk indigent defendants. These low-risk indigent defendants are charged with offenses such as shoplifting, traffic violations, loitering, and drinking in […]

October 14th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Human Rights|0 Comments

Carpenter v. United States: Does the Government Need a Warrant to Obtain Cellphone Location Information?

By: Candice C. Izaguirre, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The Fourth Amendment protects “he right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures. . . ” Does this right apply to cellphone data?

In June 2017, the Supreme Court granted certiorari […]

Should Hate Crimes Be Their Own Crime or a Considered Factor in Sentencing?

By: Heather Carngeie, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In today’s society, hate crimes and hate speech are rampaging more than they have in many years, but what if that behavior itself was punishable rather than being coupled with other crimes, such as assault, as a sentencing factor? Would it better […]

October 12th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, LGBT Rights|0 Comments

iPhone Video Re-Recordings: Inaccurate Duplicates Under Federal Law

By: Yamila Lorenzo, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Cell phones have become necessary devices in our everyday lives. The essential nature of these devices has lead developers to put everything a user might need in their daily lives into the devices, including powerful cameras. When looking through a tourist area […]

October 9th, 2017|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Students “Packing” on College Campuses

By: Jacqueline Rosado, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Florida Republicans are once again trying to introduce multiple gun bills before the Florida Legislature. The “Open Carry and Prohibited Places Reform” bill, sponsored by Senator Greg Steube, will help “expand the places and circumstances under which gun owners can carry their […]

October 3rd, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Governments, Gun Rights, Trending|0 Comments

Saint or Sinner? Man Convicted of Using Santeria to Coerce Victims into Having Sex

By: Cynthia Ventura, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On September 22, 2017, Sergio Carmona-Martinez was found guilty by a jury of five counts of sexual battery on a victim between the ages of twelve and eighteen. Carmona-Martinez, who knew both victims, told the first girl that she was surrounded by a “bad […]

September 28th, 2017|Blog, Criminal Law, Trending|0 Comments