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A Botched Medical Review System

By: Riona Maharaj, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, December 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

You go into the hospital for a forty-five-minute surgery to alleviate your chronic back pain, the result of being a truck driver for nearly two decades. As you awaken from the anesthesia you hear the panicked medical staff around you. They are […]

November 20th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Health Law, Torts, Trending|0 Comments

Euthanasia on the Opposite End of Corporal Punishment: Hypocritical Standpoint?

By: Ashley Ann Bryan, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, December 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

With the growth of technology and great advancement of modern-day medicine, there should be a reconsideration of the legality and use of euthanasia. However, there continues to be a reluctance in this regard, while the legality and support of capital punishment […]

November 13th, 2018|Criminal Law, Elder Law, Florida, Human Rights|0 Comments

Man’s Best Friend Saves the Day, Once Again

By: Jesse Ochoa, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Usually, it is Timmy who pleads to his companion, Lassie, to find help when he is in a sticky predicament; this time, it was Joshua Horner, a man in Oregon who needed to find Lucy, a black Labrador, that could reverse […]

November 5th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Falcon v. State: Should the Florida Supreme Court Have Opened the Door for Sentencing Review of Juveniles Sentenced to Life in Prison for Murder?

By: Jamie Mathis, Editor-in-Chief, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law

Abstract
In Florida, and other states across the country, hundreds of juvenile murderers are getting a second chance at having a life outside of prison. These are juveniles who were convicted and sentenced to life in prison decades ago, but because of the […]

#TIMESUP YouTube

By: Elina Rojas, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

With the ever growing expansion of YouTube celebrities and influencers comes a dark side: sexual misconduct.  Sexual misconduct is an umbrella term for actions that are sexual in nature and are conducted without consent. Typically, sexual misconduct involves situations where power dynamics in […]

Does an Unauthorized Driver have a Societal Expectation of Privacy in a Rental Car for Fourth Amendment Rights?

By: Riona Maharaj, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Justice Anthony Kennedy stated, “Asking questions is an essential part of police investigation. In the ordinary sense a police officer is free to ask a person for identification without implicating the Fourth Amendment.” The Fourth Amendment allows an officer to conduct a traffic […]

May 2nd, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Fourth Amendment|0 Comments

Solutions to Ending School Shootings Requires Sacrifices Most Americans Are Unwilling to Make

By: Kristen Chirino, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Once again, the nation is faced with yet another school shooting.  On Wednesday, February 14, 2018, a former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School opened fire in the hallways after pulling the fire alarm, killing seventeen people, fourteen students and three faculty. […]

May 1st, 2018|Blog, Criminal Law, Gun Rights, Trending|0 Comments

Like Father, Like (Grand)son: A Virginia Man is Arrested and Charged After Impregnating his Biological Twenty Year Old Daughter

By: Cynthia Ventura, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In 1998, Steven Walter Pladl and his then wife had a baby girl, Katie Rose, who was later adopted out-of-state. When Katie turned eighteen, she turned to social media in an attempt to locate her biological parents. After successfully finding them and communicating for […]

April 26th, 2018|Blog, Criminal Law, Family Law|0 Comments

Pressures Stemming from Florida’s Death Penalty Could Lead to the United States Supreme Court

By: Luis A. Garcia Jr., J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In 2016, the United States Supreme Court in Hurst v. Florida held Florida’s sentencing scheme was unconstitutional because it gave more power to the judges rather than the juries. “The Sixth Amendment requires a jury, not a judge, to find each fact […]

April 25th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Florida|0 Comments

Cell Site Location Information and the Fourth Amendment

By: Franklin Sandrea-Rivero, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On November 29, 2017, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Carpenter v. United States. This case arose out of a series of robberies involving the theft of hundreds of cellphones. But the issue in this case was not […]