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A Botched Medical Review System

By: Riona Maharaj, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, December 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

You go into the hospital for a forty-five-minute surgery to alleviate your chronic back pain, the result of being a truck driver for nearly two decades. As you awaken from the anesthesia you hear the panicked medical staff around you. They are […]

November 20th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Health Law, Torts, Trending|0 Comments

Don’t Shoot the Messenger: The Surprising Similarities Between the Treatment of Anita Hill and Christine Blasey Ford

By: Natasha Mathurin, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

It’s a pretty safe assumption to make, to say that you have been living under a rock, if you haven’t heard about the sexual assault allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford against, Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Dr. Blasey, a […]

November 7th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Governments, Supreme Court, Trending|0 Comments

Man’s Best Friend Saves the Day, Once Again

By: Jesse Ochoa, Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Usually, it is Timmy who pleads to his companion, Lassie, to find help when he is in a sticky predicament; this time, it was Joshua Horner, a man in Oregon who needed to find Lucy, a black Labrador, that could reverse […]

November 5th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Evidence|0 Comments

Falcon v. State: Should the Florida Supreme Court Have Opened the Door for Sentencing Review of Juveniles Sentenced to Life in Prison for Murder?

By: Jamie Mathis, Editor-in-Chief, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law

Abstract
In Florida, and other states across the country, hundreds of juvenile murderers are getting a second chance at having a life outside of prison. These are juveniles who were convicted and sentenced to life in prison decades ago, but because of the […]

Is It the End for Duck Boat Tours?

By: Akia Espinoza, Senior Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

A $100 million wrongful death suit has recently been filed because of the deaths of seventeen passengers on a duck boat tour. On July 19, a severe thunderstorm rolled through Branson, Missouri, causing passengers in a duck boat tour […]

September 17th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Maritime/Admiralty Law, Torts|0 Comments

Does an Unauthorized Driver have a Societal Expectation of Privacy in a Rental Car for Fourth Amendment Rights?

By: Riona Maharaj, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Justice Anthony Kennedy stated, “Asking questions is an essential part of police investigation. In the ordinary sense a police officer is free to ask a person for identification without implicating the Fourth Amendment.” The Fourth Amendment allows an officer to conduct a traffic […]

May 2nd, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Fourth Amendment|0 Comments

Are Your Private Social Media Photos, in Fact… Private?

By: Wadad Barakat, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Kelly Forman (“Forman”) sued Mark Henkin (“Henkin”) alleging that his negligence caused her to fall off one of the horses he owns when Henkin provided her a with defective stirrup. Following the fall, Forman suffered permanent physical, mental, and psychological injuries. She was […]

April 29th, 2018|Blog, Cases, First Amendment, Free Speech, Media Law|0 Comments

Pressures Stemming from Florida’s Death Penalty Could Lead to the United States Supreme Court

By: Luis A. Garcia Jr., J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In 2016, the United States Supreme Court in Hurst v. Florida held Florida’s sentencing scheme was unconstitutional because it gave more power to the judges rather than the juries. “The Sixth Amendment requires a jury, not a judge, to find each fact […]

April 25th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Florida|0 Comments

Plead Guilty, Lose Your Rights?

By: Jamie Mathis, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

If a criminal defendant pleads guilty, can he challenge the constitutionality of the statute he is convicted under?  Does a defendant waive his right to this challenge after he pleads guilty?  Does that right have to be explicitly preserved in his plea agreement?  These […]

April 16th, 2018|Blog, Cases, Criminal Law, Supreme Court|0 Comments

Time Is Most Definitely Up

By: Jacqueline Rosado, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Less than a year ago, on October 5, 2017, a scandal was revealed big enough to make waves not only on a national, but global scale. There is no better way than to identify the “monster” behind this scandal as Harvey Weinstein, […]