STLR Forum

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Grubhub Might Promote Happy Eating, But Not Happy Drivers.

By: Christina Trueba, Executive Notes and Comments Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Many of us are familiar with convenient online and app services like Postmates, Uber, Airbnb, and Grubhub, just to name a few. These companies follow a gig economy employment model. A gig economy “refers to a general workforce […]

March 26th, 2019|Business, Cases, Employment Law|0 Comments

Sexual Harassment in the Entertainment Industry: How Non-Disclosure Agreements Perpetuate Sexual Misconduct

By: Gianni Piantini, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

In the wake of a cascade of sexual harassment accusations from dozens of celebrities against other celebrities in power, the attention has turned to Hollywood by questioning it as to why the entertainment industry has not instilled regulations to prevent such sexual […]

Tipping Out on Money You Didn’t Make

By: Ivana Romero, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

The tipping system is different in all restaurants. Some restaurants allow for a server to personally choose how much to tip the busboy or dishwasher, but most restaurants automatically make the server take out a portion of cash from the sales the […]

December 26th, 2018|Blog, Business, Employment Law, Financial|0 Comments

Gender Discrimination in the American Workforce

By: Marielys Concepcion, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Gender equality and women’s rights have played a large role in our country’s history. Beginning with the 19thamendment of our United States Constitution, allowing women the right to vote and making it unconstitutional for someone to be denied the right to vote […]

December 22nd, 2018|Business, Civil Rights, Employment Law|0 Comments

Facebook’s Platform is Facilitating Employers’ Discriminatory Practice

By: Layla Nguyen, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Pursuant to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, it is unlawful to limit job postings to one sex or on the basis of age. But how are employers still able to segregate […]

Illusion or Collusion? Colin Kaepernick’s Biggest Hurdle

By: Jonathan Manoy, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

On August 14, 2016, Colin Kaepernick, in a San Francisco 49ers pre-season game, sat during the National Anthem. This move set the stage for the silent protest movement that gained numerous followers and became so controversial during the 2016-17 N.F.L. season. Kaepernick […]

December 20th, 2018|Business, Evidence, Sports and Entertainment Law|0 Comments

Low Fares at High Costs: How Uber has Negatively Impacted Taxi Drivers Around the Nation

By: Carolina Del Campo Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Since the introduction of ride-sharing apps, such as Uber and Lyft, passengers have appreciated the easy, inexpensive mode of transportation that is both user-friendly and at the touch of their fingers. However, what these owners and passengers have failed to consider […]

December 18th, 2018|Business, Employment Law, Financial, Technology|0 Comments

NFL Hall of Famers Want a Piece of the Pie

By: Marcus Davide, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Last week, in a letter signed by Pro Football Hall of Fame board chairman Eric Dickerson, Hall of Famers demanded health insurance as well as an annual salary derived from the National Football League’s yearly revenue. NFL greats such as Jerry Rice, […]

December 13th, 2018|Blog, Business, Contracts, Sports and Entertainment Law|0 Comments

Artificial Intelligence and the Legal Profession: No Longer a Sci-Fi Fantasy

By: Andrew Bratslavsky, Member-Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Imagine the following scenario: Mr. C is a repeat offender, having committed several non-violent petty crimes over his criminal career. One day, Mr. C is arrested yet again, arraigned, and eventually sentenced to 20 years in prison for violating the newly enacted […]

The (Un)Bias in Artificial Intelligence for Hiring Decisions

By: Leah Maurer, Member Candidate, J.D. Candidate, May 2020, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Artificial intelligence (“AI”) is being used more and more frequently by human resource departments and in employment decisions. AI can be involved from the start of finding job applicants and sorting through resumes, to the most recent use of actually conducting job […]

December 11th, 2018|Business, Employment Law, Technology|0 Comments