STLR Forum

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A Blind Spot In Miranda Rights: Juveniles’ Lack Of Understanding Regarding Miranda Language

By: Wadad Barakat, Senior Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract 

Currently, police officers are required to inform suspects in custody of their Miranda rights.  These rights include the right to remain silent, the right to legal counsel, and that anything they say can be used against them.  Because the language of Miranda can be complex for minors, individuals under […]

April 27th, 2019|Abstracts, Issues, Latest Articles|0 Comments

Lethal Injection or Lethal Litigation: Florida’s Amended Lethal Injection Protocol Opens the Door for Cries of Cruel and Unusual Punishment

By: Cynthia Ventura, Articles Solicitation Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

Capital punishment in the United States and its tolerability as a constitutional form of punishment has long been recognized and debated over since its inception.  In Florida, lethal injection has been the primary method of execution since the 1990s. In […]

February 11th, 2019|Abstracts, Featured Home, Florida, Issues, Latest Articles|0 Comments

Defending Self-Defense: Why Florida Should Follow the Eleven States That Already Allow for Campus Carry

By: Jennifer Garcia, Executive Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2019, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

Most states have allowed for their citizens to carry concealed weapons as
long as they become licensed by the state; Florida is one of them. However,
this concealed carry right is limited in that concealed weapon permit holders
are prohibited from carrying on college […]

Prisoners of the Zip Code: How Single Zip Code Rate-Making Hurts the Public Interest

By: Ansell Fernandez, Articles Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

This comment argues that setting auto insurance rates based on socioeconomic factors from a single ZIP Code, as it is now allowed in Florida, may violate Florida law prohibiting the use of race or national origin in calculating premiums. The comment […]

March 21st, 2018|Abstracts, Cases, Financial, Human Rights, Issues|0 Comments

A Right Without a Remedy: Time Runs Out Before the Right to File Accrues for Successive Habeas Corpus Petitioners

By: Agnieszka Chiapperini, Articles Solicitation Editor, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

In June of 2015, the Supreme Court struck down a portion of a federal statute as unconstitutional. For the next ten months, District Courts all over the country came to inconsistent conclusions regarding the new decision’s retroactive application.  As a […]

March 14th, 2018|Abstracts, Cases, Criminal Law, Human Rights, Issues|0 Comments

Dostoevsky as Juvenile Justice Advocate and Progenitor of Therapeutic Justice

By: Professor Amy D. Ronner J.D. Ph.D., Professor of Law, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

Undeniably, the physical and psychological abuse of children is a recurrent theme in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s fiction and journalism, particularly in The Brothers Karamazov and A Writer’s Diary.  In three parts, this paper explores Dostoevsky’s fixation with childhood suffering and […]

February 28th, 2018|Abstracts, Family Law, Human Rights, Latest Articles|0 Comments

Black & Poor: The Grave Consequences of Utah v. Strieff

By: Chanae Wood, J.D. Candidate, May 2018, St. Thomas University School of Law.

Abstract

The Supreme Court’s decision in Utah v. Strieff proves to chip away at Fourth Amendment rights, yet again. In Strieff, the Unites States Supreme Court ruled that an arrest warrant is an attenuating circumstance that will purge an illegal stop. This ruling incentivizes […]